The Taliban’s War on Education

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The Taliban is an Islamic fundamentalist organization that are responsible for a movement in Afghanistan that began as a militia in 1994, became the official government of Pakistan in 1996 and transitioned into an insurgent group in 2004. The movement gained strength as a result of the Afghan Civil War, and became a prominent faction that held immense power in Afghanistan from 1996-2001. Their methodology and practice includes a strict interpretation of sharia, the Islamic law, and their main goal in Afghanistan during their time of power was the implement it. The conservative culture in the region coupled by the backward views of the Taliban has prevented girls from receiving an education.

Leaders of the Taliban strongly believe that the education worth receiving is the one they preach, in fact the Taliban bans girls from receiving an education after the age of 8. The primary reason that the Taliban and other conservative entities have the power they do, is because they provide food, healthcare, and security in areas stricken by poverty and violence. That being said, education is a cost of these “benefits” and therefore, these communities are set back by this leadership because educating members of the community could eventually generate a political threat.
An article in the Guardian describes the Taliban as being “alarmingly efficient” in their war on education. Between the Taliban attack on a school in Peshawar in December 2014, to numerous other acts like acid acts and other violent behaviours towards students and teachers, mostly female, the Taliban has made it evident that going to school, and educating anyone, specifically girls, is not on their agenda. In Swat valley, Pakistan, where the Taliban has taken over girls are ‘banned’ from being enrolled in schools. The article states that “in Swat alone, about 120,000 girls and 8,000 women teachers stopped going to school.” With the Taliban’s influence still pretty strong in particular provinces across Pakistan and Afghanistan, going to school and being female is not only dangerous, it is illegal.

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